HOMELESS AND MARGINALISED

People who are homeless, or who are involved in the sex industry, prisoners, ex-offenders, people struggling with addictions and those with mental health challenges… These are often the people on the margins of society, the most vulnerable and overlooked. 

They’re among the people in London least reached with the gospel. 

Often, the lives of people who are homeless and marginalised are chaotic and damaging. It can be daunting to know where to even start with gospel ministry.  

But we follow Jesus’ example, to engage personally and compassionately with people who can so often be overlooked. With our experience in this kind of ministry, we can help churches develop or grow ministry with people who are homeless and marginalised, and together take every opportunity to share the life-changing good news of Jesus. 

“For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me” (Matthew 25:35) 

Working together with churches

We partner with churches to share the gospel with people who are homeless and marginalised.  

We do this through Hope Community Homes, a supported housing scheme for people trying to get off the streets, and Webber Street Day Centre, where people who are homeless receive food, friendship and the good news of Jesus. We help churches come alongside ex-offenders and former street workers, to help people find new life in Christ.  

To find out how we can support your church, email us at ministries@lcm.org.uk 

'Jesus is the centre of my life now'

Pawel came to London aged 18 looking for a job. But a few beers after work with mates soon turned into a self-destructive addiction to alcohol. Twelve months later, Pawel was homeless and alone. 

For two years, Pawel slept under bridges and in shop doorways around Waterloo and London Bridge. But when Pawel stepped into our centre for homeless people, Webber Street, things began to change. 

“From the moment I first went in, I felt loved,” said Pawel. Every morning, after receiving a free hot breakfast, Pawel heard the gospel – and his heart began to open to Jesus. “I started feeling different,” he said. “If what they were telling me was true, I wanted to go and see.” 

Pawel went to rehab, stopped drinking and gave his life to Christ. Today, he’s married, with a good job and a beautiful family. “Jesus is the centre of my life now,” said Pawel. 

Because London needs Jesus